Ask me anything   Submit   Lover of faith, literature, beauty, art, thought, and history.
My other blogs:
jesus-logos.tumblr.com
historynewsandviws.tumblr.com

lilacsinthedooryard:

Jean-Leon Gerome 
Dante and Virgil in Hell

lilacsinthedooryard:

Jean-Leon Gerome 

Dante and Virgil in Hell

(via chucrutypilsen)

— 12 hours ago with 89 notes

5centsapound:

Ara Guler’s Anatolia

Turkey’s most well-known photographer, has taken more than 800,000 photographs documenting Turkish culture and important historical sites.  Featured are photographs of medieval Seljuk and Armenian buildings that Güler, who is now eighty-five years old, took in the early 1960s and printed in 1965.

(via theorthodoxbritreturns)

— 12 hours ago with 2291 notes
viktor-sbor:

Адольф Игнатьевич Ладюрнер “Двор военного училища в Санкт-Петербурге”

viktor-sbor:

Адольф Игнатьевич Ладюрнер “Двор военного училища в Санкт-Петербурге”

— 13 hours ago with 3 notes
meanwhilebackinthedungeon:

— Donato Giancola
Red Sonja - a lover’s quarrel

meanwhilebackinthedungeon:

— Donato Giancola


Red Sonja - a lover’s quarrel

(via meanwhilebackinthedungeon)

— 14 hours ago with 199 notes
yuri-rimsky:

Icon of Christ the King of Kings and High Priest of Glory.

yuri-rimsky:

Icon of Christ the King of Kings and High Priest of Glory.

(via varangoi)

— 1 day ago with 83 notes
A BALLAD OF SIN →

hierarchical-aestheticism:

George Sylvester Viereck

IN dreams on a far-off shore I lay
(Dreams that were full of dread),
Where the purple clouds of a dying day
Shadowed a sea of red —
Shadowed a sea as red as the blood
Of one that was slain in his lustihood,
A sea as red as a lover’s blood
Struck down in his amorous…

— 1 day ago with 5 notes
melancholyway:

Otto Henry Bacher (1856-1909)Nude, 1893

melancholyway:

Otto Henry Bacher (1856-1909)
Nude, 1893

(via hypatiaalexandria-world)

— 1 day ago with 10 notes
illustrious-divinity:

2nd - 3rd century depiction of Adam and Eve from Catacombs of San Gennaro (St. Januarius) Napoli, Italy 

illustrious-divinity:

2nd - 3rd century depiction of Adam and Eve from Catacombs of San Gennaro (St. Januarius) Napoli, Italy 

— 1 day ago with 34 notes
femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
While Jakub Schikaneder’s monumental-scale Murder in the House (painted in 1890) certainly makes for a striking composition, its narrative is unsatisfyingly open-ended.
It invites scrutiny, and even vain attempts at amateur sleuthing: does the broken, unlatched window represent a possible point of entry, or merely the ramshackle poverty of the little alley? Are the marks of blood on the far wall of the rounded arch and the ground before it signs of a struggle? The trail of a dumbfounded murderer staggering away, steadying himself with his bloodied hand once here, then once more there? Simply the vestiges of the victim’s own terrified flight out to the alley?
The reactions of the onlookers are a little more self-evident, but even their discussion remains a little ambiguous: it’s fully possible, for example, that the gesturing man witnessed the crime from his candle-lit window, and emerged through his door (now ajar) with his wife and daughter to tell the little crowd that formed. Or perhaps they’re just all trying to decide what they’re supposed to do about the body.
What about you, dear reader—any theories?

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

While Jakub Schikaneder’s monumental-scale Murder in the House (painted in 1890) certainly makes for a striking composition, its narrative is unsatisfyingly open-ended.

It invites scrutiny, and even vain attempts at amateur sleuthing: does the broken, unlatched window represent a possible point of entry, or merely the ramshackle poverty of the little alley? Are the marks of blood on the far wall of the rounded arch and the ground before it signs of a struggle? The trail of a dumbfounded murderer staggering away, steadying himself with his bloodied hand once here, then once more there? Simply the vestiges of the victim’s own terrified flight out to the alley?

The reactions of the onlookers are a little more self-evident, but even their discussion remains a little ambiguous: it’s fully possible, for example, that the gesturing man witnessed the crime from his candle-lit window, and emerged through his door (now ajar) with his wife and daughter to tell the little crowd that formed. Or perhaps they’re just all trying to decide what they’re supposed to do about the body.

What about you, dear reader—any theories?

(via ahiddenworld)

— 1 day ago with 331 notes
Evolution of the English Language →

mediumaevum:

  • Old

Hwæt. We Gardena in geardagum,
þeodcyninga, þrym gefrunon,
hu ða æþelingas ellen fremedon.

  • Middle

Ye seken lond and see for your wynnynges,
As wise folk ye knowen all th’estaat
Of regnes; ye been fadres of tydynges
And tales, bothe of pees and of debaat.

  • Early Modern (early phase)

So whan the duke and his wyf were comyn unto the Kynge, by the meanes of grete lordes they were accorded bothe. The kynge lyked and loved this lady wel, and he made them grete chere oute of mesure – and desyred to have lyen by her. But she was a passyng good woman and wold not assente unto the Kyng.

— 1 day ago with 1376 notes

allthingslinguistic:

What the English alphabet used to look like

A new video from Tom Scott, who you may remember from his previous series of linguistics videos, on the evolution of the English alphabet from this:

ABCDEFGHIKLMNOPQRSTVXYZ&ǷÞÐÆ

to this:

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

I had to double-check what he said about eth (Ð,ð) and thorn (Þ,þ) being interchangeable for voiceless and voiced versions of the same sound, since I’d assumed that since /ð/ is voiced in the IPA it also was in Old English, but I’m happy to say he’s right! 

More on Old English, including sample texts (Beowulf, the Lord’s Prayer, and the Charter of Cnut) at Wikipedia

— 1 day ago with 231 notes